Yikes!—That’s a Big Sheet of Paper!

Large watercolor in the Currents & Eddies series by Lynne Baur, in progress.
I’m working on an exciting commission for Lakeview Hospital in Stillwater, MN. When completed, this piece will be on three large panels, and will be the largest piece in this series to date. This large sheet of paper (about 32×55″) is from a roll—no double-elephant available in time, alas! Just for fun, I left a camera […]

I’m working on an exciting commission for Lakeview Hospital in Stillwater, MN. When completed, this piece will be on three large panels, and will be the largest piece in this series to date. This large sheet of paper (about 32×55″) is from a roll—no double-elephant available in time, alas!

Just for fun, I left a camera running for the first couple of hours of work and compiled a short video so you can see how the paintings in this series get started.  There was a small problem with video quality settings that I didn’t discover until afterwards, but I think you can still get the idea. Hope you enjoy this little behind-the-scenes sneak peek!

P.S. If any of you watercolorists out there have some slick tricks for cutting watercolor paper off a roll without swearing as it constantly tries to curl up again, I’m all ears!

Update: If you’re curious how this all turned out, you might want to have a look at these articles, which will take you through this commission (two large triptychs) from start to finish. 🙂

Update on the “Giant Painting”

The “Giant” Painting is Now 3 Panels

Second Large Triptych Completed

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