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painting by Lynne Baur of large purple and orange dragonfly on abstract background
Fine-tuning my email system to tailor the news to YOUR current interests. After many on-again-off-again attempts to keep a newsletter going, I’ve finally found a system that works! Please keep reading to see how it will work. Future weekly newsletter emails will be short and easy-to-scan, but I need your cooperation to really make the system […]

Fine-tuning my email system to tailor the news to YOUR current interests.

After many on-again-off-again attempts to keep a newsletter going, I’ve finally found a system that works! Please keep reading to see how it will work. Future weekly newsletter emails will be short and easy-to-scan, but I need your cooperation to really make the system work well. Please read on to see how you can help me send you all the news you really want AND make it easy for you to get through your inbox quickly (at least my part of it!).

Starting in January 2015, I’ll be sending a weekly summary email , with links to news about upcoming classes and events, peeks behind-the-scenes, painting challenges, new work and how-to articles for beginners and experienced watercolorists.

Here’s what you need to do to make the system work best:

1. Click links to articles of interest as soon as you receive the email, even if you plan to come back later to read in more depth.

The email management system uses clicks within the first 24 hours as a measure of interest. If you wait until “later”, two bad things happen: I don’t see an accurate measure of your interest and (worse!), if you’re like me, you forget!

So, please, at least click through so I know you are interested.

2. Don’t be alarmed if you are occasionally asked to enter your email address again, even though I already have it.

It doesn’t mean you somehow got lost from my list. What’s really happening is that my email management system is working in the background to make a note of your interest in certain topics. It makes a temporary sub-list so I can send follow-up information ONLY to those who actually want it.

It might seem like an extra step, but it’s actually easier for both of us. I used to ask you to send me an email telling me you wanted to be added to a list to get more information (e.g., when registration opens for a particular class), and then I kept the list manually so I’d know who to notify. Now, you only have to enter your address instead of sending a whole message, and the system keeps track for us.

I hope that occasionally re-entering your address will be a fair trade-off for getting more in-depth information on the things you really care about, while not being inundated with things that don’t interest you.

Don’t worry about missing out—everyone will get the summary emails, so if something doesn’t work for you right now, you’ll still have a chance to ask for information later. And if you’re not actively clicking through on followup emails on a given topic for some time, you’ll be asked if you still want the emails on that topic. (This is another reason it’s important to click on links you DO find interesting.)

A COUPLE OF REASSURANCES:

  1. I respect your privacy! I’m not looking over your shoulder to see what articles you read. I just see how many clicks there are. (And of course I will NEVER share your email information with anyone else.)
  2. This won’t be a bunch of extra work! Quickly scanning a summary and clicking links to read more about what YOU want to know about should be faster than scanning through a looooooong email to find the bits you want to read. And entering your email address to opt-in for updates on a topic should be faster than sending me an email to say you want updates.

I’m excited about streamlining things to get more of a conversation going! I have lots of new things planned for you in 2015. Stay tuned!

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